NICKI MINAJ’S COMMENTS IN AMERICAN IDOL SEASON 12: AN ANALYSIS OF WOMEN’S LANGUAGE FEATURES

Diana Chandra, Made Frida Yulia

Abstract


Women are believed to speak differently from men. They carry certain features which are distinctive in their speech (Lakoff, 2004). However, some women are found to speak differently from women’s speech in general. This phenomenon is reflected in the use of language by Nicki Minaj, one of the judges of American Idol Season 12, whose speech stands out above the rest of the other women. The study investigates Nicki Minaj’s comments in American Idol Season 12 in terms of women’s language features. It focuses on two issues, namely how the language used by Nicki Minaj in American Idol Season 12 conforms to women’s language features and what possible factors cause the absence of women’s language features in Nicki Minaj’s comments to the contestants of American Idol Season 12. To find answers to the two questions, document analysis was employed, in which seven videos of live performances taken from American Idol Season 12 were examined. The findings revealed that women’s language features which appeared in Nicki Minaj’s comments were intensifier, emphatic stress, filler, rising intonation, and lexical hedge. The rest of the features did not appear in her speech; they were tag question, ‘empty’ adjective, precise colour term, ‘hypercorrect’ grammar, ‘superpolite’ form, and avoidance of strong swear words. This phenomenon can be accounted for by four possible factors that cause their absence in Nicki Minaj’s comments to the contestants of American Idol Season 12. They were father’s speech, ethnicity, community of practice, and different social psychological perceptions.

 

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24071/ijhs.2018.010204


Keywords


women’s language, women’s language features, Nicki Minaj, American Idol

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References


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p-ISSN: 2597-470X (since 31 August 2017); e-ISSN: 2597-4718 (since 31 August 2017)

IJHS Journal Vol 1 No 2 publication date: 8 March 2018

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International Journal of Humanity Studies (IJHS) is a scientific journal in English published twice a year, namely in September and March, by Sanata Dharma University, Yogyakarta, Indonesia.